Catherine Darli...
2014-02-24 08:45

I don’t have enough time... there I said it. I have been shooting myself in the foot with that statement for about 3 years now. The reality is that I have just as much time as anybody else. Yep, 24 hours of it per day. That is quite a generous allotment of minutes; minutes just waiting to be put to use. I am thinking about time because in the next month I will have a lot of free time suddenly at my disposal. I have been tending my little grand-daughter for nearly 3 years and now she is moving out of state with her mama. With her birth I went from being a full time artist to full time ‘Nama’. It’s been an absolute joy to take care of my Lily Rain, and although I have had to juggle my art around her, it’s been worth every minute spent. However, having had the luxury of painting full time and then having to share that time with the kidlet was when I started saying “I don’t have enough time” (bang, bang, ouch, ouch – just shot myself in the foot.)

Austin Kleon said that people would often ask him, “How do you find the time?” He would answer, “I look for it." He went on to say that you might have to miss an episode of your favorite TV show, you might have to miss an hour of sleep, but you can find the time if you look for it.

I have to agree. Rather than saying “I don’t have enough time,” I should have just said to myself something like the old Jell-O Gelatin commercial used to say... “There’s always room for Jell-O." 

Oh, don’t get me wrong, I still painted during these past few years, but if I hadn’t saddled myself with “I don’t have enough time” and said instead “There’s always room for art” I think I would have been more at peace with myself about accomplishing the things I wanted to do. Truth is, now that I think about it, I realize that I really don’t have any regrets as my precious Lily Rain season draws to an end. I will miss seeing her chubby little cheeks daily much more than the time I would have spent on art.

And with that realization I will make an effort to cherish time as I begin to draw another season (quite literally). 

Catherine Darling Hostetter is an artist, mother of 5 and grandmother of 3. She lives in Salt Lake City, Utah. 


Jeff Clay
2014-02-12 22:28

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A last stop in the Dordogne -- before arriving in Bordeaux, dropping off our rental car and catching a train for Paris -- was at the 16th century chateau-cum-castle called Monbazillac. Known for its rich, sumptuous, velvety, and quite sweet dessert wine, the chateau looks part medieval bastion and part Renaissance mansion. Inside are grand rooms with furniture and furnishings from the 1600s and other accouterments of centuries past. However, we never got a chance to see any of that as the staff was out to lunch. Literally. 

You may have heard, the French are serious about their food. They are also quite adamant that lunch time be occupied with ... lunch. So when we arrived, there was no one there to greet us. There was no one there at all. It was empty. On the door of the caveau -- where one would taste and buy wine, if one could -- was a sign in French: out to lunch ... or something to that effect.

But straight ahead was a long carriageway leading to the chateau, in brilliant sunshine and billowy white clouds piling up behind it. And there was no gate, no fence and no keep out we are eating sign. No tourists milling about, no photographers jockeying for position, no distractions. By my reasoning, the gods were shouting "carpe diem!" Seize the moment. Indeed.

With but an hour before needing to hit the road again, I bent to the joyful task of photographing the exterior of the grand chateau. In black & white and color.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

East of Bordeaux and west of Provence, in the north of the ancient region known as Aquitaine, is the old French province of Périgord. Now called Dordogne, it is a region of craggy castles, honey-colored stone villages, deep walnut forests, and the painted caves of long-gone Cro-Magnon man. Dordogne Dreams is an exploration of this region using infrared-sensitive cameras. Though the Dordogne is a colorful region, infrared techniques permit the presentation of this land in a different light. As in a dream, the images can transport one back to another time, in a different land. Sweet slumbers.

As the principal of Clayhaus Photography, Jeff Clay specializes in fine-art landscape, architecture, and travel images. He lives in Salt Lake City, UT with his wife, Bonnie, and their three wild and crazy retrievers.


Jeff Clay
2014-02-05 12:44

 Visit modern Sarlat -- the "capital" of Périgord Noir, the ancient region of tangled walnut forests and truffle hunters located in southeast Dordogne, France -- and you would be forgiven for thinking that the words 'quiet' and 'Sarlat' can be muttered together. Sitting in a hollow between dark green hills, Sarlat is multi-sected by roads heading off in the directions of the compass. For over 1500 years this was the place people came to trade, to sell and buy goods and foods; the place to seek the favor of the wealthy and powerful; to socialize, eat and drink and seek shelter. Therefore, in this area at least, all roads lead to Sarlat.

But people -- certainly not travelers and tourists -- don't come to Sarlat to visit the modern. Park outside the compact medieval center (no cars allowed!) and pass through one of the still standing stone portals and you will see why people come to Sarlat. Cobbled streets, 12th century monuments and 16th century buildings...alleys wandering seemingly without purpose but always leading to some setting evocative of the word anciens. Regardless of the time of year, you are likely to bump into fellow explorers milling about the shops and restaurants along the Rue de la République, the main drag of central Sarlat and surely renamed multiple times over it's millennium and a half lifetime. Veer off to the west and you will find a warren of narrow passages cast in perpetual shadow by four-story stone buildings. It is here that you find the true quiet of Sarlat.

The babble of languages recede behind you, the clacking of plates and clanging of cash registers fade. Enter into the stony silence of Sarlat's past, a most exquisite time machine, the perfect doorway framing the almost forgotten.  

East of Bordeaux and west of Provence, in the north of the ancient region known as Aquitaine, is the old French province of Périgord. Now called Dordogne, it is a region of craggy castles, honey-colored stone villages, deep walnut forests, and the painted caves of long-gone Cro-Magnon man. Dordogne Dreams is an exploration of this region using infrared-sensitive cameras. Though the Dordogne is a colorful region, infrared techniques permit the presentation of this land in a different light. As in a dream, the images can transport one back to another time, in a different land. Sweet slumbers.

As the principal of Clayhaus Photography, Jeff Clay, specializes in fine-art landscape, architecture, and travel images. He lives in Salt Lake City, UT with his wife, Bonnie, and their three wild and crazy retrievers.


Cyrene Swallow
2014-01-29 09:44

Every year I try to focus my energy on completing a few new series of paintings.  Last year I finished my "Wizard of Oz" series and this year I wrapped up my new "Peter Pan" series.  Being an artist I have many projects ongoing at once.  Besides being in Local Colors of Utah Gallery I am trying to build a portfolio of children's book illustrations.  This is one of my most favorite projects to work on.  I will be taking these two illustrations along with ten others to the SCBWI (Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators) conference the first of February.  I hope you enjoy them!

 

 

Cyrene Swallow is an Orem-based artist who loves to paint the worlds of reality and fantasy with bold, beautiful, colorful brushstrokes. She is a member of Utah Valley Art Association in Utah County and of the Executive Committee of the Local Colors of Utah Gallery.

 


Jeff Clay
2013-11-19 20:04

Torn grey clouds cast scattered showers; below the Vézère River flows languidly. Springtime in the Dordogne region of France continues to oscillate between cool dampness and brilliant sunshine, full of the warming promise of summer.

Clearing the thin woods, the muddy trail approaches a high limestone out-cropping. To our left, the hill falls steeply through dense undergrowth to the now-shining river. Ahead the trail turns into a well-worn path over the rock with large natural limestone cavities forming shallow caves. We are at the Troglodyte Village of La Madeleine, where people have lived, on and off, for over 17,000 years.  

This area bears witness to almost the entire progression of Western Civilization: from cave-dwelling Cro-Magnon man hunting mammoths to 17th century cavaliers riding about in foppish attire. As we wander through the caves and marvel at the carved niches to hold tallow candles, the hand-dug gutters to drain multi-millennia's worth of rain, the narrow steps riding high on the rock to unseen outposts and a crumbling castle above, we wonder of the lives led. During times of war and raiding, calamitous storms and famine, how tenuous was their survival? On those beautiful, peaceful days (and surely there must have been many) did they gaze out over the lazy river and green fields and marvel at the wonder of their lives?

At some time in the 8th century a small chapel was carved out of the rock. Rebuilt in the restrained Gothic style of mid-1300s, the simple La Madeleine chapel speaks to us still, across the many years. Climbing the narrow stone stairs and entering through the heavy door, light streams through Gothic stained glass, pinched and crowded by the outside overgrowth. It is quiet and chilled within these walls: the murmuring of priests and parishioners long stilled; the warmth from fellow villagers a distant memory; thick, welling clouds of frankincense and myrrh, centuries gone.

But stand long enough, bend your mind and imagination, and you can almost feel the whispers of the past, close by.

 

East of Bordeaux and west of Provence, in the north of the ancient region known as Aquitaine, is the old French province of Périgord. Now called Dordogne, it is a region of craggy castles, honey-colored stone villages, deep walnut forests, and the painted caves of long-gone Cro-Magnon man. Dordogne Dreams is an exploration of this region using infrared-sensitive cameras. Though the Dordogne is a colorful region, infrared techniques permit the presentation of this land in a different light. As in a dream, the images can transport one back to another time, in a different land. Sweet slumbers.

As the principal of Clayhaus Photography, Jeff Clay, specializes in fine-art landscape, architecture, and travel images. He lives in Salt Lake City, UT with his wife, Bonnie, and their three wild and crazy retrievers.


Catherine Darli...
2013-11-14 13:34

This month marks the second anniversary of Local Colors in our Sugar House location. It is a beautiful gallery that reflects the hard work and many hours put forth by our artists. For those that walk through our door, we proudly display our artwork and are grateful to all the patrons who support us. The past two years has been a little tough for the business with the construction that has surrounded us and still will be for at least another year. We feel fortunate to have welcomed new neighbors that have opened their doors to provide a variety of cuisines and have also brought traffic to our gallery. We are grateful for this supportive community and are proud to be in the heart of beautiful Sugar House.

I am delighted to be represented by Local Colors of Utah and enjoy the friendship of the artists. Recently we held our monthly gallery meeting. The artists came bursting with ideas on how to bring more traffic to our business. We have so much to show our patrons! On December 6th we are hosting a special event. The Salt Lake Gallery Stroll is a couple of weeks earlier than normal and is held on the first Friday of that month.

Local Colors is pleased to present a special fundraiser for the Christmas Box House. The University of Utah Recreational Therapy students have organized this event. They are going to do a recreational art activity with the children of the Christmas Box House and sell prints and calendars of the children’s artwork. The students will donate the profits of these sales to the Christmas Box House. That day Local Colors will also participate and donate 10% of all the Gallery Sales of our artists to the Christmas Box House. Great time to pick up that Christmas Gift of original art. Please come and support this worthy cause!

 

Here are the details:

  • What: Christmas Box House Fundraiser Reception
  • Where: Local Colors of Utah, 1054 E. 2100 S.Salt Lake City Utah 
  • When: Friday, December 6th
  • Time: 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM

As you can see I am pretty excited about this event. Don’t wait until December to come visit us though! Our current show is our annual Holiday Group show – Dreamscapes and Wonderlands. Fine art makes great gifts: be original, buy original.

 

Catherine Darling Hostetter is a painter that works in watercolor, acrylic and oil in a whimsical style. She has been a member of Local Colors since 2006. Currently Catherine serves as president.


Cyrene Swallow
2013-10-10 14:57

"I Can Fly" has been such a wonderful and positive theme to work with.  I decided to paint four new pieces for this show.  I am showing two southwestern oil paintings and introducing a new series.  Peter Pan is my new series. Last year I took on Wizard of Oz, and this year I am attempting Neverland, Captain Hook, Peter, Wendy, John, Michael, and Tink.  These are finished in watercolor mixed media with an illustrative style.  I decided to continue the pop out look as I did in Wizard of Oz because people seemed to enjoy and comment on the dimensional effect that it has.  

I would like to thank my neighborhood kids who came over for an afternoon and let me push and pull them until I had them in just the right positions.  They were wonderful models!  Perfect actually! And just for the record, I do believe in fairies!

 

Cyrene Swallow is an Orem-based artist who loves to paint the worlds of reality and fantasy with bold, beautiful, colorful brushstrokes. She is a member of Utah Valley Art Association in Utah County and of the Executive Committee of the Local Colors of Utah Gallery.

 


Catherine Darli...
2013-10-07 09:05

I am excited to be a featured artist this month at Local Colors. The theme for our show is “I Can Fly”. If you are familiar with my work, you will know that my paintings often have a whimsical twist to them. ‘Free Flying Lessons” is a new painting for my show. Usually I like to let the viewer decide the meaning behind the painting, but today I will try and give you a little insight.

Often a thought comes to my mind and I just paint it. With “Free Flying Lessons”, I thought about chickens and how flying relates to them. My summation is that they are not known for their ability to fly well or for long distances. Hence, free flying lessons... in the clouds no less.

Not exactly a profound tidbit of wisdom. That’s why I call it whimsical!

Come and discuss this and other deeply insightful paintings with me at our Salt Lake Gallery Stroll reception on Friday, October 18th. 6:00 – 9:00 PM. I look forward to seeing you there!

 

Imagination is the highest kite one can fly ~ Lauren Bacall

 

Catherine Darling Hostetter is a painter that works in watercolor, acrylic and oil in a whimsical style. She has been a member of Local Colors since 2006. Currently Catherine serves as president.


Debbie Valline
2013-10-03 17:48

Did you know that Gemstones have living energy?  Every gemstone has several attributes.  Good luck or positive energy is just one of the attributes of many stones. You can also use more than one stone to enhance the energy of another.

As we change our way of life, our vibrations change.  That is why some gemstones will work differently on the same person at different times. Keeping a small bowl with gemstones on a desk, in the bedroom, or in the living room can promote the “luck” or “positive energy” to change in your life and house.  You can also wear a piece of jewelry to enhance the positive energy or to promote a change into your life. Gemstones help change the life force around you; therefore, possibly changing your luck.  Take a moment to think if you own a necklace, bracelet, ring, or earrings that just plain make you feel good when you wear it.  Or maybe good things happen when you wear that piece of jewelry.  It may be the energy of the stone(s) or metal(s) that promote that “feel” or “good luck”.

We talked about gemstones, but they are not only thing can bring positive energy into your life.  What about “bugs”?  That’s right - Ladybugs, crickets, dragonflies, butterflies, or scarabs are a few “bugs” that are considered “lucky”.  Going back to that piece of jewelry that makes you feel good when you wear it - Maybe it is a dragonfly or butterfly.

Over the next few weeks I’m going to explore making jewelry that will combine either many stones that enhance specific life energies or these same stones along with critters that are considered to bring specific “luck”.  Let’s see if we can come up with a combination that will give you a feeling of “I Can Fly” in specific areas of your life.  Check back as I create “Wearable Luck”.

Debbie describes herself as a Jewelry Architect.  She loves to create and build pieces incorporating mixed metals, enhanced with precious and semi-precious stones and often with a whimsical use of fibre.  She lives in Riverton, Utah with, Jim, her wonderfully supportive husband.  Debbie is proud to be an active member of Local Colors Fine Art Gallery.


Cyrene Swallow
2013-09-04 06:36

I have much to do to get ready for my fall show at the gallery.  I am also working on illustrating a children's book, so my time is pulling me in many different paths. I enjoy both illustrating and exhibiting and sometimes my pieces cross over.  I am trying to pave my own "Yellow Brick Road." 

This painting is from last years series "The Wizard of Oz."  This is Scarecrow with a pumpkin head which I thought represented the season well.  Each piece has a different set of ruby slippers and I had fun using cow girl boots for this one.  I thought it was very appropriate.

May the Wicked Witch leave you to enjoy your hunting next month and I look forward to showing you my new pieces for my upcoming show in the third week in October.

 

Cyrene Swallow is an Orem-based artist who loves to paint the worlds of reality and fantasy with bold, beautiful, colorful brushstrokes. She is a member of Utah Valley Art Association in Utah County and of the Executive Committee of the Local Colors of Utah Gallery.