Jeff Clay
2013-05-16 23:24

The U.S. Geological Survey claims there are eight islands in the Great Salt Lake. Other sources put the number at nine or ten. The Utah Geological Survey tops them all at eleven. The discrepancy arises from how you claim an island is in fact an island. Stansbury is rarely ever an island, joined as it is to the southwest shore by a long, rather wide isthmus, yet it is called an island, and actually resembled one in the very wet 1980's. On the other hand, Strong's Knob, a prominent rock rising several hundred feet high and located just off the north end of the Lakeside Mountains, is likewise usually landlocked but only rates "knob status." One thing that can't be argued though, is that Antelope Island is by far the largest island in the lake.

It is also the most visited island and one of the reasons is to view the island's wildlife. The ubiquitous bison, large mule deer, the rarely seen bighorn sheep, wiley coyotes, shy bobcats, numerous different bird species and of course the pronghorn antelope, for which the island is named. It has been recorded that John C. Fremont was the first non-native human to explore the island (in 1845) and named the island after the animals he shot for food. Three years later the Fielding Garr Ranch was established and the island began its long transition from natural environment to open-air stockyard for sheep and cattle.

The irony is that prior to their successful re-introduction to the island in 1993, the pronghorn was was reported to have 'disappeared' in the 1930s. I have tried to determine how a species can disappear from what was then a closed environment (no causeway) but given our animal husbandry track record at that point and the fact that in the '20s and '30s there were over 10,000 sheep foraging on the island, I can certainly imagine their fate. The happy news is that they are back and with a herd of around 200 are thriving quite nicely. 

The double irony is that the antelope of Antelope Island — and indeed, of North America — are not in fact antelope at all. Correctly they are called pronghorn and are the last living species of a biological family whose closest relatives are...giraffes and okapi! Strange, but true. But, we can easily forgive the early explorers and settlers their taxonomic tribulations as the pronghorn certainly much more closely resemble old world antelope than giraffes!

 

"Witchery Skies" and "Antelope Island Reflection" are just two expressions of Utah's West Desert. More can be seen in my "Seeing the West Desert, In a Different Light" portfolio.
 
 
As the principal of Clayhaus Photography, Jeff Clay, specializes in fine-art landscape, architecture, and travel images. He also does portrait and event photography as a partner in Perfect Light Studios. Finally, with a background in information technology and project management, as sole proprietor of Clayhaus Consulting, he works with non-profits and small businesses to help implement Internet and social media campaigns. He lives in Salt Lake City, UT with his wife, Bonnie, and their three wild and crazy retrievers.

 

Mae Wellington
2013-05-16 20:44

Having a hobby as wonderful as fused glass is like having Christmas morning any time. Whenever I load my kiln with new glass I get super excited. Then, I have to wait for hours...sometimes days. I get so excited when it's time to open up my kiln to reveal what's inside. Then: wow! What a great surprise to see what I have just made and how it has turned out. Sometimes the result is wonderful...sometimes not so much. But, fun all the same!

Come to Local Colors Fine Art Gallery at 1054 East and 2100 South in Sugar House to see all my wonderful glass creations and to find out how you to can get started with a rewarding hobby all your own. Whether it is photography, painting, collage, pottery, glass, jewelry, and metal work, Local Colors has art and classes available. Stop by today and talk to a artist working their shift. We are open 11 am 7 pm, Tuesday through Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 3pm.

Start a rewarding hobby of your own!

  

Mae Wellington's artistic passion is making handcrafted fused and stained glass gifts by either fusing glass together or by using the copper foil method. She resides in the Salt Lake area and her work can be found at Local Colors of Utah.


David Arthur Jones
2013-05-13 09:36

Where do ideas come from?

I had an idea about a rider coming down from the high desert to the oasis in the bottom of the valley.

Start with a sketch on the wrong side of a hunk of Masonite.

Strengthen some shadows. Start to work in a little color.

Lets see what happens.

The lines? There’s architecture in nature. I have some ideas about what I want to do.

  

 

David Arthur Jones is a painter who works in a variety of media, primarily Oils. He and his wife live in the heart of horse country in Utah’s Tooele Valley. Although David is a Westerner by choice as well as by heritage, his subject matter is not limited to Western Art.


Jeff Clay
2013-05-09 15:31

On my first backpacking trip, oh so many years ago, I remember having an argument with my friend and hiking companion on the merits of dead trees. We were high up in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, close to the tree line, and, as in any un-managed area (read: natural) there were both live and thriving and dead and fallen trees. His argument was along the lines that the dead trees did no one any good and should therefore be hauled out for some sort of human use.

Never mind the horror of trying to extract timber from rugged 10,000 foot mountains with roads miles and miles away, I took umbrage with the very notion that if something doesn't directly benefit the human race, its of little use. I still do. Of course, at the time, I was 17 and knew nothing of biodiversity and healthy habitats. I knew not that dead trees are of major 'use' to forests, the small creatures that live beneath and in rotting wood, as well as the copious plant life that feeds off of the humus of decaying vegetal matter. I did know that seeing a forest without fallen and greying trees would be strange and yes, unnatural. Orchards are clean and cleared of the dead, not forests.

My friend and I did agree on one more immediate use of dead trees: firewood. We were cold and camping, of course.

Now when I see a dead tree, I see the stark lines of its limbs evocatively reaching for the sky. I see the elemental struggle and pattern of all: what once was, is no longer. I see a form reduced to its simplest and spare. I see a subject for my camera.

 

"High on Jedidiah Mountain" is just one expression of Utah's West Desert. More can be seen in my "Seeing the West Desert, In a Different Light" portfolio.
 

As the principal of Clayhaus Photography, Jeff Clay, specializes in fine-art landscape, architecture, and travel images. He also does portrait and event photography as a partner in Perfect Light Studios. Finally, with a background in information technology and project management, as sole proprietor of Clayhaus Consulting, he works with non-profits and small businesses to help implement Internet and social media campaigns. He lives in Salt Lake City, UT with his wife, Bonnie, and their three wild and crazy retrievers.

 


David Arthur Jones
2013-05-08 14:47

The trees were budding out.

The patio was open.

One story after another. Up, up ,up.

Action west of Habit Burger.

A springtime swarm outside the Gallery.

A bucket full of bees.

A box full of bees.

The trees are budding out.

    

  

David Arthur Jones is a painter who works in a variety of media, primarily Oils. He and his wife live in the heart of horse country in Utah’s Tooele Valley. Although David is a Westerner by choice as well as by heritage, his subject matter is not limited to Western Art.


Jeff Clay
2013-04-22 08:54

 

The ill-fated Donner-Reed Party stumbled their way across this expanse in 1846. Part of the now-notorious Hastings Cutoff — a supposed short-cut to California promoted by an ambitious young frontiersman by the name of Lansford Hastings — the "short-cut" was anything but. Convinced by Hastings to take "his" route, in the late summer of 1846 it took the Donner-Reed Party 6 days to cross the 80 miles of the Great Salt Lake Desert. Wagons became bogged down in the salt, axles broke, and thirst-starved oxen wandered off. By all accounts, it was a miserable crossing. The delay proved fateful and indeed fatal. By the time the party neared the Sierra Nevadan heights that now bear their name — Donner Pass — they were snowbound and starving. The rest is a grim chapter in frontier history. 
 
This pass — named after the full party: Donner-Reed — is below and out of direct view to the right in this image, taken from high up on the northern tip of the Silver Island Mountains. Less than a decade ago bits of crockery and wagons were discovered buried in the muddy salt of the Bonneville Flats. Crater Island is to the upper right and the Pilot Range, on the border with Nevada, is to the left.
 
"Donner-Reed Pass Panorama" is just one expression of Utah's West Desert. More can be seen in my "Seeing the West Desert, In a Different Light" portfolio.
 

As the principal of Clayhaus Photography, Jeff Clay, specializes in fine-art landscape, architecture, and travel images. He also does portrait and event photography as a partner in Perfect Light Studios. Finally, with a background in information technology and project management, as sole proprietor of Clayhaus Consulting, he works with non-profits and small businesses to help implement Internet and social media campaigns. He lives in Salt Lake City, UT with his wife, Bonnie, and their three wild and crazy retrievers.


 
Cyrene Swallow
2013-04-19 17:00

Many people have asked me "how do you name your paintings?"  I don't know that there is a rule that I follow.  Sometimes the idea for a painting comes first and while I am working the painting, a name develops from the piece.  Other times I have an idea for a painting and the name will come immediately and the painting evolves from the name.  There have been many nights when I have woken in the middle of the night with a title or an idea for a painting.  I scramble in the dark for a pen and a journal to write it down before it slips from my mind.  Some of my favorite titles are:  "I Am On Fire Tonight," "Hide and Seek," "Build Your Garden," "Reaching For My Heart,"  "Coming Home," "Castle of Crystal," and more.  

I hope that when people view a piece of fine art that they take time to read the title and ponder on what the artist might be portraying.

 

Painting entitled "I'm On Fire Tonight!"

 

 

Cyrene Swallow is an Orem-based artist who loves to paint the worlds of reality and fantasy with bold, beautiful, colorful brushstrokes. She is a member of Utah Valley Art Association in Utah County and of the Executive Committee of the Local Colors of Utah Gallery.


Jeff Clay
2013-04-10 22:57
In most ways conceivable Little Sahara National Recreation Area is the antithesis of the wild lands and wilderness I usually seek for my landscape photography. Sixty thousand acres of sand and sagebrush have been set aside for OHVs to play upon. On holiday weekends the campgrounds swell to thousands. Even at night the constant buzz and whine of ATVs and motorcycles can be heard for miles as the contraptions race about like frantic hornets, guided by their high beams. 
 
The sands are the result of 15,000 years of deposition as ancient Lake Bonneville receded and the Sevier River shrank. Over time Sand Mountain, the high point of the area, grew to almost 700 feet high. Why these beautiful sand fields were sacrificed to the 2-stroke demi-gods I don’t know. Nonetheless, there are two sections that are OHV-free and worth exploring on foot. 
 
Infrared photography is a wonderful way to bring out the dunes' soft shapes and sensuous forms and last year I did just that. The wind was kicking up which created beautiful streamers of sand and the ripples seemed to be etched into the dunes. Initially I was even hesitant to walk on the seemingly artfully-created forms, but could see my footsteps disappearing as the sand filled in the depressions.
 
I've always been attracted to sand dunes and someday would like to tread the vast, sandy seas of Arabia or Tunisia, Namibia or Mongolia. For now, our own Southwest will do just fine, as indeed did Little Sahara one afternoon.
 
"Shifting Sands" and "Ripples"  are just two expressions of Utah's West Desert. More can be seen in my "Seeing the West Desert, In a Different Light" portfolio.
 

As the principal of Clayhaus Photography, Jeff Clay, specializes in fine-art landscape, architecture, and travel images. He also does portrait and event photography as a partner in Perfect Light Studios. Finally, with a background in information technology and project management, as sole proprietor of Clayhaus Consulting, he works with non-profits and small businesses to help implement Internet and social media campaigns. He lives in Salt Lake City, UT with his wife, Bonnie, and their three wild and crazy retrievers.


Debbie Valline
2013-04-05 17:23

The other day, I saw a woman wearing a fantastic piece of jewelry; however, it was not flattering on her.  Being one that custom designs jewelry, I thought perhaps some of you would like some tips that may possibly help pieces look better and/or help you look better. 

Earrings frame the face and draw attention to the eyes. Practically every woman looks great in earrings since eyes are typically our most vibrant feature. From simple studs to swaying chandeliers to bold hoops, earrings will create eye allure in a number of different ways. 

Large, flashy, hoops and dangly earrings frame the face, adding definition to the cheekbones and a slimming affect.  They also downplay large ears, because others are inclined to pay more attention to the earrings rather than the ears.  Also, earrings draw the attention upward, toward the face and neck, and away from the midsection, hips, thighs or other "problem areas."

Round shaped earrings, like buttons, pearls, or loops will soften the look of an angular face.  Angular shapes can have the opposite effect on a round shaped face.  Same thing goes for thin or wide faces: go for the opposite shape in earrings to balance the visual effect.

Bracelets accentuate the hands, wrists and can even make arms appear thinner. Bracelets are a versatile way to spotlight or de-emphasize a variety of body parts. Bracelets can draw attention to your waist and/or hip if the bracelet is similar to what is being worn.  Otherwise, bracelets can draw attention away from your mid-section if its design is in contrast to what you are wearing.

Thick chunky bracelets should be worn on thick wrists, which help disguise them. Thin, delicate wrists, however (as many larger women have), should avoid chunky bracelets that could look too large when balanced against fine wrist bones.  Small, delicate bracelets look good on petite wrists.   Similarly, ankle bracelets highlight the legs & feet in addition to ankles.

Adorn yourself with a necklace when you want to draw the focus to your upper body. Chokers, pendants, bibs, lariats, and luxurious long strands all give prominence to different areas of this seductive part of your body including your lips, neck, chest and décolletage.

A long necklace adds visual length to a short body.  A choker might be the best bet for tall and thin. Full figures benefit from long necklaces to stretch the visual line, but don't go too delicate or it will only emphasize bulk.  Go bold! 

To make a neck look longer, wear long necklaces. Long necklaces make the neck look slimmer and longer by drawing the gaze downward along the length of the throat. However, be careful when combining long, dangly earrings with long necklaces, as the effect can be overwhelming. Wear shorter, flashy earrings, with a long necklace, to attract some attention to the face and keep people from staring at the belly.

Large busted?  Be aware of the length of the necklace.  Too high creates a saggy and older look.  If it lands at the bust line it just looks strange and ridiculous.  Try a length an inch above the cleavage line, or a long necklace that lands at the waist.  Emphasize that thinnest part with the necklace just as a belt would.

1. Slender Neck: If you have a slender neck, go dainty.  Chokers are your forte.

2. Thick or Bulky Neck:  Chunky necklaces are great and hide extra bulk.

3. Long Craned Neck:  Layered necklaces or one with many strings. Never wear a delicate design no matter how chic it looks. It will emphasize the neck length and make it look stretched.

4. Short Stubby Neck: Wear long necklaces; really long ones that reach the naval. This will distract attention from the neck to the lower half of your body.   Jewelry that is tight around the neck will highlight the stubby nature of your neck.

With all the above said, remember, jewelry is fun!  We all love to be adorned!  Maybe you don’t care if a piece looks good.  Maybe it just makes you feel good!  Then throw everything I said above out the window.  Because, everyone should have fun with jewelry, bold colors, not so bold, large and not so large, unusual and traditional.  Be adorned and be happy, sending you smiles!

Debbie Valline, is the designer and creator for "Valline", custom designed, hand forged jewelry specializing in mixed metals ranging from Sterling silver to copper and brass including unusual stones and beads from around the world. She also is a partnering artist with "To Dye For" specializing in custom dyed wearable art. Debbie is proud to be involved with Local Colors Fine Art Gallery and is currently vice-president.  She currently lives in Riverton, UT with her husband, Jim, and all of their outdoor toys.


Melody Johnson
2013-04-04 08:36

I’ve always been obsessed with trying to figure out what is going on inside of my head. Reveling when I found a book, a picture, a piece of a performing art that not only recognized my form of thinking but who I am. I think in pictures and words. Not just talking words, but words that paint pictures in my mind. And, everything I notice fills me with awe.

I refused to be a visual artist because of some unfortunate art teachers. I wrote and loved directing theatre but creating visual art was beyond me. I thought being an artist meant I had to do everything just exactly right. After I started teaching, I found myself through some whimsy of fate in Washington D.C. with a very bright student named Rebbecca. We soon found the National Museum of Art. Every second we could spare was spent absorbing the art. I saw Van Goghs and Rembrandts and Whistlers. There in front of me were da Vincis and Monets and Mondrians.  

The experience charged me and pushed me forward. I started oil painting, and I began sketching everywhere and everything. I started taking art classes. I tried new media and new styles. A new world opened up to me. 

Then in my mind, I hit the same old wall. I started entering shows and doing art fairs. But, I wasn’t perfect. I wasn’t just so. The harder I tried the more frustrating making art became. I was teaching art by then and found creative joy in exploring art with some of the students. My own art was static.

One of the methods I taught to beginners was ripped paper collage. They loved it. My brain took a leap, and I saw a connection between several old ideas. I could take pieces of colored, patterned paper and cut them the way I made brush strokes. I’ve been doing and experimenting with cut paper collage ever since. The process has freed my mind of the old perfectionism.    Collage is free form and organic.  Visions of pictures I want to create leap into my brain.

Wonderful.

 

 

Melody Jean Smith is an artist, writer, and teacher who lives in Saratoga Spring.She is a member of Local Colors of Utah, a cooperative gallery in Salt Lake City loves to be visited or contacted by people who enjoy her work, want to learn, or just want to talk. You can see her work on the Local Colors web site or her own web site