Debbie Valline
2013-03-02 13:24

Have you ever picked up a pair of earrings or chain from your jewelry box only to put it back, because it was so tarnished that you could not get yourself to put it on?  Hopefully, I can pass on some tips to keep your silver tarnish-free. 

There are a couple of things to know about silver.  The higher the content of silver the less it will tarnish. Silver is made with alloys, which encourage tarnishing.  Thai silver and fine silver (99% pure) have higher silver content, so they do not tarnish; however, you will pay a higher price for these.  There is a new silver called Argentium that is priced in between fine silver and sterling silver, but does not tarnish.  Sterling silver has a higher percentage of alloys, so it tarnishes faster; however, it is much more affordable. 

There are a number of things that you can do to slow or stop tarnish.  It is oxygen that promotes tarnish.  To keep oxygen away  from your silver, you can place your silver pieces in plastic bags, squeeze out all of the air and seal the bag.  Those silver earrings will be ready to wear with no cleaning necessary.  Silica gel packs (those little packets that remove moisture) placed in your jewelry box will also help.  You can also purchase anti-tarnish strips by 3-M, which will keep your silver from tarnishing by placing one in with your silver.  Lastly, there are a lot of products now available that makes cleaning silver very easy and the tarnish is very easily removed. 

Silver cleaner is readily available.  You can pick it up in your local grocery store.  There is paste and there is liquid where you just dip.  You do need to be careful if you have natural stones in your piece.  In this case I would use a Q-tip, being very careful not to get the cleaner on the stone.  The safest way for pieces with stones is to use a polishing cloth.  The cloth has cleaning elements embedded in the cloth.  Just rub the piece with the cloth and the tarnish comes off leaving your silver with a beautiful shiny finish.  The cloth will become black with use from the tarnish; however, you can keep using it for a very long time as the black does not come off onto your jewelry and it keeps cleaning. This cleaning cloth can be found in most stores that sell jewelry or through the Internet.  I hope this information will help keep your silver clean and ready to wear at a moment’s notice - KEEP ON SHINING!

Debbie Valline, is the creator and artist for "Valline", custom designed, hand forged jewelry specializing in mixed metals ranging from Sterling silver to copper and brass including unusual stones and beads from around the world. She also is a partnering artist with "To Dye For" specializing in custom dyed wearable art. Debbie is proud to be involved with  Local  Colors  Fine Art Gallery and is currently vice-president.  She currently lives in Riverton, UT with her husband, Jim, and all of their outdoor toys.



 

Jeff Clay
2013-02-25 13:27

Question: Are the Newfoundlands the most remote mountain range in the lower 48? Answer: Unknown, as how does one measure that? What is known is that it takes considerable effort to reach these mountains. Easily seen north of I-80, one can only drive to them via very circuitous routes, skirting the (normally) dry mud flats that completely surround the jagged range. Don't bother googling a route: the directions erroneously take you through an off-limits area on 4WD roads. Instead, from the east, a little over 1/2 way between SLC and Wendover, take the Lakeside exit (#62). The sign will say "Military Area, No Services," but don't despair. Drive north through Puddle Valley. The low Grassy Mountains are to your left, the higher Lakeside Mountains, on the right. Both are worth exploring in their own turn. This is a wonderfully lonely stretch of pavement. Look for pronghorn as they abound in this area and are not as skittish as they seem elsewhere in the West Desert. Gradually you will hit a fence stretching to the left and right. Ahead, the unmanned gate will be open, assuming the military are not bombing. Yes, you have entered a bombing range, but if you stay on the public access road you will be safe and unharassed. Now on packed gravel, another 15 miles will take you to the railroad siding Lakeside. Once there was a small town here comprised of railway workers and their families. I have never found a trace of it.

You are at the edge of the Great Salt Lake. Marching to the east is the railroad causeway built in the 1950's. It's about 18 miles before it touches land again at the southern tip of the Promontory Mountains. Rarely will you see anyone out here. From Lakeside, the route to the northern edge of the Newfoundland Mountains is another 25 miles on a gravel road that follows the course of the Union Pacific tracks. You will pass by the great, silent pumps at Hogup, built in the 1980's to stave off flooding, which seems pretty quaint now. Eventually you will see the Newfoundlands rising starkly and steeply from the vast expanse of the Bonneville Mud Flats. By the time you finally reach a signed siding at Groome, the mountain range lies before you, running as most Basin and Range mountains do, north to south. Your only choice now is whether to explore the east side or the west side of the range. Regardless, I hope you brought plenty of water and food...you are a long way from nowhere.      

Twenty miles long and only 3-5 miles at the widest, the Newfoundlands were once the home to a few mining claims and a bit of sheep herding. Now deer, badger, fox, coyote, golden eagles, red-tailed hawks, and prairie falcons live off of the 16 springs that can be found. Currently unprotected, the range is largely included in the America's Red Rock Wilderness Act proposal. 

"View From the Newfoundlands" is just one expression of Utah's West Desert. More can be seen in my "Seeing the West Desert, In a Different Light" portfolio.

As the principal of Clayhaus Photography, Jeff Clay, specializes in fine-art landscape, architecture, and travel images. He also does portrait and event photography as a partner in Perfect Light Studios. Finally, with a background in information technology and project management, as sole proprietor of Clayhaus Consulting, he works with non-profits and small businesses to help implement Internet and social media campaigns. He lives in Salt Lake City, UT with his wife, Bonnie, and their three wild and crazy retrievers.


Cyrene Swallow
2013-02-21 07:50

My Wizard Series was inspired by my family's love of musical theater.  My husband and son were cast in "The Wizard of Oz" at the Scera Center for the Arts performance in Orem, UT.  

One night my husband said, "I wish you would do a Wizard series; there is so much that can be done with it." Boy, was he right!  The Tin Man was a commissioned piece for a customer visiting from Pennsylvania. She came into Local Colors Gallery while I was working on The Cowardly Lion.  Her daughter was cast as the Tin Man in her local high school production and she wanted to send a painting back to her.

In every painting in my series Dorothy is wearing a different pair of Ruby Slippers, which makes each painting fun.  In the Tin Man she is wearing rainbow socks and Crocs because that was the cusotmer's daughter's favorite thing to wear....crazy toe socks and crocs!  

 

Cyrene Swallow is an Orem-based artist who loves to paint the worlds of reality and fantasy with bold, beautiful, colorful brushstrokes. She is a member of Utah Valley Art Association in Utah County and of the Executive Committee of the Local Colors of Utah Gallery.


Jeff Clay
2013-02-18 11:24

West of the San Francisco Mountains march the Wah Wah Mountains. Known more for their name -- which in a Ute dialect means “good, clear water,” -- than just about anything else, the Wah-Wahs offer plenty of solitude in alpine and sub-alpine environments. There is a grove of ancient bristlecone pine on Wah Wah Peak itself and for rock and mineral collectors, the mountains contain the largest known deposits of the hyper-rare gemstone red beryl. The range is bisected by state highway 21 and divided into two Wilderness Study Areas. 

I was contracted by The Wilderness Society several years ago to photograph several mountain ranges in the southwest region of our West Desert for use in wilderness proposals. The proposals came to naught but I was left with a number of beautiful images of these little known and even less explored desert mountains. In this image a line of small yucca plants point towards Wah Wah Peak in the North Wah-Wah Range.

 

"The Wah Wah Mountains" is just one expression of Utah's West Desert. More can be seen in my "Seeing the West Desert, In a Different Light" portfolio.
 

As the principal of Clayhaus Photography, Jeff Clay, specializes in fine-art landscape, architecture, and travel images. He also does portrait and event photography as a partner in Perfect Light Studios. Finally, with a background in information technology and project management, as sole proprietor of Clayhaus Consulting, he works with non-profits and small businesses to help implement Internet and social media campaigns. He lives in Salt Lake City, UT with his wife, Bonnie, and their three wild and crazy retrievers.


Catherine Darli...
2013-02-18 11:05

I am a domestic artist; a home-body and a painter. Home and family are a large part of my life and my art is woven through out.

Inspiration for my paintings comes from my day to day activities. Sometimes something that seems rather insignificant plants an image in my mind that will find its way into my art.

This past week I have been making a natural yeast starter from scratch. Until the mid-1800s this was the kind of yeast that made bread rise. A starter is simply a combination of flour and water that is left out to ferment. You have to feed it daily with more flour and water to encourage fermentation. After about 7 days the mixture becomes bubbly and alive.  It is then ready to begin a life that will continue as long as it is cared for. Some starters age many years, and I have heard of a bakery that uses a starter that is over 80 years old. I imagine there are some much older. Most people acquire their starter by taking a little bit of other people’s starters and feed it. Or, as I mentioned, you can start your own from scratch. 

The starter is not like our modern day “quick yeast” where you throw a couple of tablespoons in, then knead the dough and let it rise until it is ready to bake. A couple of hours and you have a hot loaf of bread. With a starter you have to mix the ingredients and let it sit for 12 hours or so before you even begin the usual bread baking process.

Why would you want to take so much more time making a loaf of bread in this hurry-up world of ours? Or for that matter make your own bread at all? Wheat has been outlawed as an un-digestible grain, and in this modern day people find they are allergic or develop disease attributed to the “staff of life”.  Interestingly enough it is not whole wheat that is the culprit! Our modern yeast bypasses the process that makes wheat bread healthy and nutritious for us.  Natural yeast and the longer rise creates an acidity that breaks down gluten to safe levels and turns phytic acid into a cancer fighting anti-oxidant. Holy Cow! Bet that’s something that your mom forgot to tell you (Or Grandma).

So art, wherefore art thou? How does my art tie into this topic of natural yeast?

In March I am a featured artist at Local Colors and the theme for our show is “Between the Lines”. My interpretation of this theme is to paint images inspired by quotes from my favorite authors and books. I am going to include a sampling from a recipe book about baking bread from natural yeast.  The book that inspired this painting is called “The Art of Baking with Natural Yeast” by Caleb Warnock and Melissa Richardson. I credit the information that I have shared with you from the authors. 

Between the lines is something that is not immediately apparent, like the difference between natural yeast and quick yeast in making homemade wheat bread. My painting titled “On a Cinnamon Roll” is an illustration of my home-body adventures.

Catherine Darling Hostetter is a painter that works in watercolor, acrylic and oil in a whimsical style. She lives in Sugarhouse and has been a member of Local Colors since 2006. Currently Catherine serves as president.


Rebecca Gates
2013-02-16 13:40

...or, How to Stop, Smell, and Photograph the Roses

There is a certain sadness I feel in seeing something beautiful fade, whether it is a living thing, a beautiful sunset, a perfect summer day.  Sometimes you may see something breathtaking or fascinating that you know no one else will probably see, or at least may not see it as you see it.  Doesn’t that make you want to capture it somehow so that you can re-live that moment again and share it?  In Japanese cultural tradition, this awareness of the transient nature of all things is called mono no aware, or the “aah-ness of things”, meaning that when you realize how quickly all things fade and change, you have a heightened appreciation for, and ability to find, the beauty in everyday moments and the world around you that you otherwise might pass by without a second glance.  Photography has been my means of cultivating this awareness on a daily basis.  It has also become my mode of artistic expression, each picture being an extension of myself and what it is I find interesting and beautiful in the world.  I can capture and preserve a beautiful moment, and then carry it with me to share and experience time and time again. 

One of the first things I do when I purchase a new lens or camera is test its limits and experiment with all of its features.  Inevitably, this process takes me to my garden where I become engrossed in framing  close up the beauty of one of my favorite natural wonders:  Flowers!  Impressive in their variety, flowers invite you to come closer, to see the various phases of their lifespan, breathe in their scent and look into their hearts.  The keys for me in finding the perfect photographic representations of a flower are patience and taking advantage of the right time of day when the quality of light is best (usually morning or late afternoon), and especially after rain.  I take a lot of images, and I’m not afraid to be the crazy lady taking pictures in her yard for neighbors and passersby, holding the camera up high or standing on one leg and reaching over at a ridiculous angle.  Or I can be the crazy lady stopping her car by the side of the road because the sunflowers are calling her and begging to not be overlooked or forgotten as they grow beside the business park.  As you may have guessed, I always have a camera with me, so opportunities abound, and my portfolio is overflowing with beautiful moments.  Now I can give gifts of flowers from my garden year-round and share them with you.  Come to Local Colors and experience flowers larger than life, but be sure to stop and smell the roses along the way.

Rebecca Gates has been creating digital photography artwork for the past four years.  She also dabbles in portraiture, creative writing, interior design, astronomy and dabbling.  Rebecca has lived in the Salt Lake valley for most of her life, and spent over a year living in Northeastern Brazil.  Part of her heart also belongs to marvelous areas along the Pacific Coast Highway, and to California in general.  Rebecca joined Local Colors at the end of 2011, and enjoys her work as secretary of this unique artistic organization.
 


Kathy Jones
2013-02-14 23:18

It's been fun making one of a kind pillows and purses for our LOCAL COLORS GALLERY in Sugarhouse.

I'm always in the hunt for exceptional fabrics and adornments for these one of a kind creations.

I started this type of work in the 1960's and expanded into professional tailoring.

My mother-in-law, Lillian Jones, and her sister, Bess Wood, were exceptional apparel designers and fiber artists in a variety of disciplines. They took me under their wings. With them, I took workshops under some nationally known teachers. I was able to win some prizes at the state level in bridal dresses and quilt making. It has all been quite a satisfying journey.

I was always interested in two dimensional art as well. I have worked in  pastel, colored pencil, watercolor, acrylics, and oils and had opportunities to study under some very talented painters.

I also worked as a commercial photographer for many years including portraiture, wedding photography, photo laboratory work, and photo retouching.

I believe being involved professionally in these many disciplines has worked synergistically for me, and I can't imagine a life without creating art on a regular basis.

As I begin a project, I have a vision in my mind. Generally, as I proceed, the project itself begins to insert an influence of it's own. Sometimes I am quite surprised when I determine that I have reached the completion point.

It's fun to meet patrons, friends, and customers at LOCAL COLORS GALLERY and chat about my work and the work of our many talented artists.


David Arthur Jones
2013-02-14 23:07

I'm working on several Western Theme Paintings to have ready by May when I'll be a featured artist at LOCAL COLORS GALLERY.

Some folks believe that if you are going to paint horses you need to know horses. If you're going to paint the Western Way of Life, you need to know the Western Way of Life. To support that idea, I have seen mistakes made by folks who didn't know, and didn't know they didn't know. People who do know, spot those errors quickly. So, the moral of the story is, paint what you know. Your life experience is unique and it may be a wonderful thing if you can share it with others. I ask myself, why do you want to paint something? Is it a good idea? Can it be made into a sound composition? Are the values, regarding darkness and lightness, acceptable? What about color? Very seldom do we find screaming colors in nature. As distance increases, color decreases. Different colors weaken at different rates.


I'm a studio painter. Some folks think you should be on the scene. I thought about doing some "premier coupe" paintings of bull riders but I've seen too many skilled athletes, flattened, so, some dumbbell behind a flimsy easel doesn't stand a chance.


I hope to produce some interesting paintings for the May show.

 


Jeff Clay
2013-02-11 10:50

For a photographer, clouds can make an image, just as the lack of them can break one. Whether high wispy cirrus, aggressively uplifting orthographic or boiling strato-cumulus, clouds will add drama and character to a photograph. Often, they may be dominant and help define a composition as in this portrait of  Wrathall Pass. An insignificant rise in the land separating the northern reaches of the Lakeside Mountains from the central region, the high cirrus flare adds an exclamation point to the land below. 

Part of the Art of photography is seeing it, before taking it.

"Wrathall Pass" is just one expression of Utah's West Desert. More can be seen in my "Seeing the West Desert, In a Different Light" portfolio.
 
 
 

As the principal of Clayhaus Photography, Jeff Clay, specializes in fine-art landscape, architecture, and travel images. He also does portrait and event photography as a partner in Perfect Light Studios. Finally, with a background in information technology and project management, as sole proprietor of Clayhaus Consulting, he works with non-profits and small businesses to help implement Internet and social media campaigns. He lives in Salt Lake City, UT with his wife, Bonnie, and their three wild and crazy retrievers.

 

 


Gail Galarneau
2013-02-10 12:44

A Dream or a Lightning Bolt, A Jolt!

I am Alive in the Desert.

And the Boulders roll over us

until we are smooth,

Old Souls refined in time & eternity.

The Earth rises up to embrace us,

“Finally, You are Home”, it says, “Please join me”

A Spark ignites, “It’s up to You

to Keep it going, Glowing bright.”

 

Gail Galarneau is a largely self-taught painter specializing in the creation of art with an optimistic point of view. She mainly uses acrylics in her work. Her studio is located in the Rockwood Studios in Sugarhouse.